Filed inArticle Lethal Weapon

Press: ‘Lethal Weapon’: Hilarie Burton Breaks Down the Future of Riggs and Palmer

TV INSIDER [Spoiler Alert: Only read ahead if you’ve watched “Born to Run,” the Oct. 10 episode of Lethal Weapon. Spoilers are discussed below.]

 

The crime in Tuesday’s episode of Lethal Weapon was the attempts made on the life of rock star Shaye (played by real-life singer JoJo), but there was also much development in the relationship between Martin Riggs (Clayne Crawford) and DEA Agent Karen Palmer (Hilarie Burton), who returned in last week’s episode.

 

However, as often happens with any relationships—even one as casual as Riggs and Palmer’s—questions start arising and feelings are expressed, and viewers are left to watch with bated breath whether the pair will stick together or come apart.

 

Here’s what Burton had to say about the events in the “Born to Run” episode, and whether we’ll be seeing Palmer again in the near future to continue (or maybe not continue) her relationship with Riggs.

Continue reading Press: ‘Lethal Weapon’: Hilarie Burton Breaks Down the Future of Riggs and Palmer

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Filed inArticle The Weight Video

Press: Sidewalk 2017: Exclusive THE WEIGHT Clip, “Grab a Shovel”

 

SCREEN ANARCHY – The 19th annual Sidewalk Film Festival kicked off last night in Birmingham, Alabama. It’s an annual celebration of independent cinema, and we have an exclusive clip from an upcoming screening that provides an example of that spirit.

 

The Weight will enjoy its world premiere on Saturday, August 26 at 9:50 p.m. at ASFA: Dorothy Jemison Day. What’s it about? “A divorcee’s love for her missing ex-husband pulls her into a small town crime ring when the sheriff refuses to search for him,” according to the official verbiage.

 

The film is loosely based on life events of director/producer Thomas Rennier. Clayne Crawford (TV’s Lethal Weapon), M.J. Brackin and Heather Roop star.

 

We have a small, noir-ish taste of what’s to come in our exclusive clip, which is certainly intriguing, as it demonstrates one man struggling with his conscience — for very good reason. Watch it below.

 

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Filed inArticle Lethal Weapon

Press: ‘Lethal Weapon’ Season 2 More Lethal Than the First

 

TV INSIDER – Fox crime drama Lethal Weapon, which rebooted the popular film franchise last year into series form, may have shifted from Wednesdays to Tuesdays for Season 2, but as you can see from the just-released key art below, it’s the same lethally fun show.

 

In the series, Damon Wayans (My Wife and Kids) takes on the role of Detective Roger Murtaugh (Danny Glover in the films) while Clayne Crawford (Rectify) puts his own spin on the role of Detective Martin Riggs (Mel Gibson). In their police partnership, Murtaugh is a little more by the book and Riggs likes to push the envelope (which may or may not help with his personal demons), but despite their differences, the pair’s track record for bringing down the bad guys is pretty darn good. The series also stars Jordana Brewster, Keesha Sharp, Kevin Rahm and Johnathan Fernandez.

 

Earlier this week at the Television Critics Association summer press tour, series creator Matt Miller said Riggs’ personal demons—much of which have to do with the death of his wife at the start of the series—won’t go away in the second season.

 

“We never really want a healthy Riggs,” he said. “What happens [in season 2] is he gets over the loss of his wife but what we come to realize is that the problems with this guy run much deeper. So we start to get deep, deep, deep in his backstory that has made him the kind of broken guy that he is today.”

 

And for those hoping Riggs will find love again, Hilarie Burton, who was a love interest for Riggs in Season 1, returns as DEA Agent Karen Palmer. Michelle Hurd has also been cast as the new precinct boss.

 

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Filed inArticle Lethal Weapon

Press: When does ‘Lethal Weapon’ season 2 premiere on Fox?

HIDDEN REMOTE – Following a breakout freshman season, ‘Lethal Weapon’ is coming back for a second season this fall on a new night that is sure to cause some headaches for fans!

 

There is no denying that Lethal Weapon was one of, if not the biggest hit of the 2016-17 for Fox. The series quickly caught viewers’ attention and began a steady performer for Fox throughout the season in its Wednesday night time slot. Thanks to the show’s success, Fox was quick to hand out a second season renewal to the Damon Wayans and Clayne Crawford-fronted drama.

 

However, the one thing that no fan saw coming was Fox’s decision to move the series from Wednesday night to Tuesday night where there show will now face off against even tougher competition! Beginning Tuesday, September 26, Lethal Weapon will make the move to Tuesday nights where it will go head-to-head with some of the biggest shows on air – which could result in a few DVR headaches for fans.

 

Now airing at 8/7c on Tuesday, Lethal Weapon will air in the same time slot as NBC’s The Voice, CBS’s NCIS (aka television’s most-watched drama) ABC’s The Middle and Fresh Off the Boat and The CW’s The Flash.

 

While the show managed to maintain a solid audience in Season 1, it did go up against softer competition which will make it interesting to see how the show fares when it returns this fall!

 

Don’t miss the Season 2 premiere of Lethal Weapon when it moves to its new night beginning Tuesday, September 26 at 8/7c on Fox!

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Filed inArticle Tinker

Press: Shot in Greenville,’ ‘Tinker’ is a collaboration between two longtime friends

Shot in Greenville and starring Clayne Crawford of ‘Lethal Weapon,’ ‘Tinker’ is a collaboration between two longtime friends

GREENVILLE JOURNAL – The new film “Tinker,” written and directed by Greenville’s Sonny Marler, is a story of people coming together and learning about their hidden gifts.

 

“Tinker” centers around a reclusive farmer named Grady Lee (played by Clayne Crawford from Fox’s “Lethal Weapon” TV series), who discovers his deceased father’s journal. As it so happens, the journal contains plans for a world-changing machine run by electromagnetism.

 

As Grady builds the machine and begins trying to piece together the life of his late father, his world changes even more: Grady’s sister passes away and gives him custody of a young boy named Kai, who’s both incredibly intelligent and very sheltered. Together, the two of them begin to tentatively form a relationship that neither of them anticipated.

 

It’s a fitting metaphor for the relationship between Marler and one of the film’s executive producers, Nick Stathakis.

 

The pair went to Travelers Rest High School together and became good friends before Marler moved to Los Angeles in the early 2000s to pursue acting and Stathakis joined his family’s restaurant business, running Stax’s Original on Poinsett Highway in Greenville.

 

“I used to go out to L.A. and visit Sonny,” Stathakis says, “And he always said that I would be the perfect left brain to his right brain — the business side to his artistic side. I told him if he ever got the opportunity to do something he thought we could work together on, to just come ask me.”

Continue reading Press: Shot in Greenville,’ ‘Tinker’ is a collaboration between two longtime friends

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Filed inArticle Rectify

The 20 Best (And 5 Worst!) TV Shows of 2016

ET – From the birth of consciousness to the afterlife, find out what made EW TV Critic Jeff Jensen’s top 20 list of shows to watch and the top five that aren’t worth your time (or space on your DVR).

 

 

BEST: 7. Rectify (Sundance)

There might have been no better scene on TV this year than the sequence in Rectify’s season 4 premiere when ex-con Daniel Holden (Aden Young) speaks of guilt, loneliness, and an alienation so great he’s forgotten what’s real and can’t decide if he even deserves his existence. “This may sound hokey as s—,” his new mentor tells him, “but you got to figure out some way to love yourself.” In the quiet, precise poetry of creator Ray McKinnon’s mystery of character, there’s no BS — only a thoughtful pursuit of truth, even as “truth” remains elusive and fogged. I could linger forever in its ambiguities, but that might be missing McKinnon’s concluding points. An increasingly wrenching final season has dialed down the surrealism as Daniel’s hazy-headed journey approaches hard revelations. Watching Daniel and his family try to divorce themselves from what’s obsolete — pain, careers, each other — and step into the future as new creations has been a teary, bittersweet joy. By the finale, I might be borrowing against next year’s Kleenex budget.

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Filed inArticle Rectify

The 10 Best TV Shows of 2016

VULTURE – Over the next few weeks, Vulture will be publishing our critics’ year-end lists. Today, we’re looking at the best TV shows and episodes.

 

It’s always tough to narrow an entire season of a vast medium down to a Top 10 list, but for 2016 it’s damn near impossible. This is, hands down, the best year for scripted television since I became a critic of film and TV 25 years ago; it might be the the best year since I started watching TV as a kid in the 1970s. The sheer variety of subjects, modes, and styles was dazzling, and it wasn’t just premium cable and streaming services that delivered wild innovation and pitch-perfect classicism; the networks stepped up, too. My initial Top 10 list had nearly 30 titles on it, and the longer I sat with it, the more I added. Some notable programs that didn’t make my Top 10 list — such as USA’s Mr. Robot and HBO’s Westworld — were so formally ambitious that they deserve respect, too; their failures are more interesting than most other shows’ successes. So it might be best to think of this list not as the cream of the crop, but as the tip of the iceberg.

 

8. Rectify (Sundance)

The fourth and final season of Ray McKinnon’s series about a newly released death-row inmate took the show in an even more unabashedly New Testament direction, stressing healing, forgiveness, and transformation. Along with Atlanta, OWN’s Queen Sugar, and Cinemax’s 1970s drama Quarry, it was also part of a great wave of new Southern fiction that counteracted many of the stereotypes that still fuel too much of American TV.

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Filed inArticle Rectify

“Rectify” Is a Quiet Marvel

THE NEW YORKER – In the first episode of “Rectify,” Daniel Holden (Aden Young) is released from death row, and he gives a speech to journalists and protesters gathered outside the prison. Rather than assert his innocence or talk about justice, he offers a zigzagging meditation on the nature of fatalism. “I had convinced myself that kind of optimism served no useful purpose in the world where I existed,” he explains, in an underwater monotone, as the protesters look on, baffled. “Obviously, this radical belief system was flawed and was, ironically, a kind of fantasy itself.” Humbly, as if ending a philosophy seminar, he concludes, “I will seriously need to reconsider my world view.”

 

For three years, “Rectify” has been a small marvel, an eccentric independent drama, filmed in Griffin, Georgia, and airing off the beaten track as well, on Sundance. With its skewed insights into carceral cruelty, “Rectify” took the slot that “The Wire” used to occupy: it’s the smart crime drama whose fans have trouble persuading others to watch, because it sounds too grim—or maybe too good for you. It’s a frustrating dynamic that has haunted other dramas without cowboys or zombies—“The Leftovers” and “The Americans” come to mind—but “Rectify” ’s reputation for difficulty is misleading. The show’s dreamy pace makes it a satisfying high, like a bourbon-soaked bob down a river on a humid day. It’s a show about the way that time gets distorted; it’s one that distorts time, too. As with many structurally daring series, it’s joyful, because its insides match its outsides.

 

It’s also, more straightforwardly, a gothic mystery about small-town secrets. When Daniel was in his late teens, he was convicted of the rape and murder of his sixteen-year-old girlfriend, Hanna. He served nineteen years, most of them in solitary confinement. The crime itself was a foggy, ambiguous incident that involved psychedelic drugs; two boys testified against him, and, under pressure, Daniel confessed. DNA cleared him of the rape but not of the murder, so plenty of locals—and, at times, Daniel himself—suspect that he did it, because he was found cradling Hanna’s naked corpse, which he’d decorated with flowers. But Daniel’s younger sister, Amantha (Abigail Spencer), never lost faith in his innocence, and she’s been sleeping with the liberal Jewish lawyer she lobbied to work on his behalf—the big-city Reuben to her Norma Rae. Everyone involved wants clarity, now that Amantha’s faith has paid off.

 

No one gets it. The murder case is reopened and leads down alarming paths. Few people want to face the uglier facts, including the knowledge that Daniel was raped in prison, multiple times. While he was on death row, his father died and his mother remarried, so he has two new stepbrothers, Ted, Jr., and Jared, who is still in his teens. In some ways, Daniel is himself an adolescent, prone to self-indulgent, self-destructive whims. In isolated Paulie, Georgia, he’s a distinctly odd figure, a socially awkward autodidact who meditated and read obsessively in his cell. He speaks in an off-kilter, whispery style, making even sympathetic neighbors uncomfortable. His mannered intellectualism marks him as an outsider, queer in several senses, as much as any suspicions of criminal guilt do.

 

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Clayne Crawford Named One of Emmy Magazine’s “Faces of Fall”

 

 

 

Lethal Weapon, Fox

 

Google the word swagger and you may find an image of Clayne Crawford.

 

After two seasons as manipulative Ted Talbot, Jr., in SundanceTV’s under-recognized drama Rectify, Crawford tackles Martin Riggs — a character made famous by Mel Gibson in Richard Donner’s 1987 buddy action film, Lethal Weapon, and its three sequels.

 

What’s more, he makes the familiar part his own. Comparisons may be inevitable, but they’re unnecessary. The story doesn’t differ much from the movie: Riggs is an unpredictable, unstable war hero with a suicidal streak who lost his very pregnant wife in a car accident.

 

Now, as an L.A. cop, he’s partnered with middle-aged family man Roger Murtaugh (an excellent Damon Wayans), with whom he butts heads, yet grudgingly bonds. Equal parts Marlboro Man and street smartass, Crawford brings a reckless renegade edge to the role, with just enough sulky sex appeal to make him both volatile and vulnerable.

 

Born and bred in Alabama, he plays Riggs as an all-American casualty with a heart of gold — more Steve McQueen than Mel Gibson. And there’s enough comic banter, generational conflict and macho pride between the two leads to keep this bro-cedural crackling with humor as well as action. And lest we forget, McQueen got his start on television, too.

Note: He has actually been in three season of Rectify with this being the fourth.

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Filed inArticle Rectify

In ‘Rectify,’ Life After Prison and the Chance to Be Reborn

NY TIMES – For decades, television has been cop, judge, jury and jailer. Police and courtroom dramas are a mainstay; a few series, like “Orange Is the New Black,” have explored prison life. But “Rectify,” a drama entering its final season on SundanceTV on Wednesday, is exceptional in being concerned with what comes after prison, for ex-convicts, for their families, for an entire community.

 

In the first episode of the new season, Daniel Holden (Aden Young), who has been released from prison after 19 years, describes what the incarceration did to him. “When you are alone with yourself all the time,” he says, “you begin to go deeper and deeper into yourself until you lose yourself.”

 

“Rectify,” created by Ray McKinnon, is a small series; it has shown a mere 22 episodes in three seasons and will have eight in its final run. But by focusing on a small world and pacing itself deliberately, it manages to be both intimate and expansive.

 

Slowing down time — the first season takes place over about a week — “Rectify” is a meditative work of reconstruction, with a visual sense of wonder, as if the camera, too, had been released into the world after two decades staring at four walls.

 

The series begins with Daniel’s return home to the fictional Paulie, Ga., after DNA evidence vacates his conviction for the rape and murder of his high school girlfriend, Hanna Dean. He’s free but not exonerated, and he finds himself unequipped for freedom. Having spent his entire adult life under a regime, he’s paralyzed by simple things like a visit to a big-box store.

 

The show traces his transition, and that of his family: his mother, Janet (J. Smith-Cameron), who resents the years lost with her son; his sister, Amantha (Abigail Spencer), who fiercely defends Daniel’s innocence; his stepbrother, Teddy (Clayne Crawford), who doubts him; and Teddy’s wife, Tawney (Adelaide Clemens), a deeply religious woman whose sympathy for Daniel draws her close to him and drives a wedge between herself and her husband.

 

Continue reading In ‘Rectify,’ Life After Prison and the Chance to Be Reborn

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