Filed in Article

Seven+ min Clip of Tinker & a Kickstarter to Help Fund It

 

Man of Science,Man of nature,man of God, anger of man, dying community,a machine and a boy who brings them all together.Story by Sonny

Grady Lee Jr. is a struggling reclusive farmer who has never wanted to be married or have children. He lost his mom when he was a young boy and by the time he was 13, his father and step-mom died in a car wreck separating him from his stepsister, Marry Ann. Randy, his father’s best friend, took Grady in and raised him as his own and kept the family farm sustained. One day, Grady discovers his late father’s hidden journal, which contains secrets of Nikola Tesla and the plans to a machine that works off of electro-magnetism and frequencies, called Jack. Grady believes it could increase productivity by drastically reducing the time it takes a plant to grow. He believes that this could be the answer to saving his farm and helping the county, when in fact this could change the world. With the help of his friend, Boudreaux, they begin to work on the device. Boudreaux, of Native American decent, can sense a change is coming for Grady. After a call from an attorney, Grady finds himself a beneficiary to his late step sister’s last will and testament, just to discover he is custodian to a special 6 year old boy, Kai. Those that meet Kai are drawn to him, all except for Grady. The kid is a distraction he would rather not have, and keeps him from Jack. Being from the city, Kai is a stranger to nature, but, his mom remembers the farm and believes this will be the perfect environment for his ability to mature.

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Filed in Article Rectify

Clayne on Having Relaxed Douche Face and Defending Rectify’s Poor Ted Jr.

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By Denise Martin
Chances are you know Clayne Crawford as that guy who always plays the jerk-off. The actor, 36, has long been typecast as the villain, most recently in 24 and Justified, and going back to his smirkiest work in teen movies like Swimfan and A Walk to Remember. But in Ray McKinnon’s outstanding small-town drama Rectify, Crawford gets to be heartbreaking as a frustrated tire salesman whose world is turned upside down when his brother-in-law is released from Death Row. Vulture chatted with Crawford about feeling bad for fratty Ted Jr., long days on set, and coming to terms with a chronic case of what he calls relaxed douche face.

 

Things are falling apart for Teddy. His marriage is in trouble. The tire business is in bad shape. I’m sure there are plenty of people who still want to punch him for the way he treats Daniel, but I just feel so bad for him.

Continue reading Clayne on Having Relaxed Douche Face and Defending Rectify’s Poor Ted Jr.

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Filed in Article Rectify TV Shows

New Clips of Rectify Season 2

It looks like this is going to take an even darker twist than last year!

The first short clips have been released for the second season of the best show you’re not watching, SundanceTV’s “Rectify,” and they already pack an emotional punch.

As Daniel (Aden Young) lies in a coma after being beat nearly to death in the season 1 finale by the brother of the girl he was convicted of murdering, his family try to deal with the fallout around him. Specifically, step-brother Ted (Clayne Crawford) confronts his wife Tawney (Adelaide Clemons) about the growing bond she began forming with Daniel last season. Was it all just about religious redemption or did she have other feelings for him? Meanwhile, in a scene that’s already breaking our hearts, Daniel talks to a joyful Kerwin (Johnny Ray Gill) in an obvious fantasy sequence set in the afterlife. Kerwin, of course, was led off to be executed last season.

As this show’s signature line says, “it’s the beauty that hurts you most.” “Rectify” returns for season 2 on June 19th. Bring on the pain.

 

 

 

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10 Actors Who Are Seriously Overdue A Starring Role
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10 Actors Who Are Seriously Overdue A Starring Role

November 16, 2013

3. Clayne Crawford

 

Holy moly. Clayne Crawford is easily becoming the Bradley Cooper of the  independent film world. We were introduced to Crawford in my all time favorite  movie ever Swimfan as swimmer Josh, always living in his best friend’s shadow.  There was something about him in that role, sure, but nothing compared to what  he is doing now. The Perfect Host, where he co-stars with David Hyde Pierce, was  shocking to me because I couldn’t believe how much Crawford had grown as an  actor. The young actors from the late 90s early 2000s went one of two ways – grew as artists or stunted themselves and stayed on the same path (Freddie  Prince Jr.?) Crawford has excelled well beyond the point of making a comeback  and I’m seriously impressed by him.

Do yourselves a favor and watch Feel (available on Netflix). You’ll feel (ha)  for all of the characters, but Crawford’s especially. He has earned the chance  to break out into the big time and I cannot wait to see what opportunities land  in his lap from here on out.

Source: What Culture

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10 Performances from the First Half that Oscar Must Remember
Filed in Article Awards

10 Performances from the First Half that Oscar Must Remember

By Joseph Braverman on July 3, 2013

Clayne Crawford in The Baytown Outlaws (Best Actor):

It’s tough to get awards buzz when the film you participated in comes out so early in the year. Even more difficult is when that early release is universally panned and has such a brief theatrical run that it’s practically seen as a straight-to-video flick. The Baytown Outlaws doesn’t deserve the excoriation it’s received, but it’s not exactly high art either. And yet, who could have imagined that such a little-seen movie would showcase a stupendous performance by a young actor that’s yet to break out? Clayne Crawford has worked as a supporting player in several films and television shows for a while now, but director Barry Battle’s pulpy Western gives Crawford the reins to lead, and lead he does. Crawford exudes Southern Cowboy charm despite his seedy appearance and even seedier line of work. But what really impressed me was the sensitivity Crawford brought to his role as the leader of the deadly Oodie Brothers. Safeguarding a handicapped teenager (Game of Thrones‘ Thomas Brodie-Sangster) from gangsters that want to retrieve him for their boss, Brick Oodie proves to be a killer with a heart. Crawford imbues his protagonist with a kindness not seen in these ultra violent shoot-em-up films, increasing the taste level of this subgenre in the process. Crawford is one of 2013′s great discoveries, an Emile Hirsch meets Matthew McConaughey-type who deserves to star in high-profile films from now on. But for the time being, Crawford at least warrants some awards recognition for his fantastic performance in this year’s The Baytown Outlaws.

Source: Awards Circuit

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Sundance Channel’s ‘Rectify’ is the Best New Show of 2013 (spoilers)
Filed in Rectify Spoilers TV Shows

Sundance Channel’s ‘Rectify’ is the Best New Show of 2013 (spoilers)

by

Sundance Channel’s ‘Rectify,’ which begins on Monday, is a weighty meditation on crime, punishment, beauty, and solitude. It is also insanely riveting television, says Jace Lacob.

Sundance Channel, the indie-centric network that is closely aligned with corporate sibling AMC, is quickly ascending to a place of prominence in an increasingly fragmented television landscape. For the longest time, the network was identifiable as the home of independent films, repeats of Lisa Kudrow’s short-lived HBO mockumentary The Comeback, and some forgettable reality fare. It lacked a cohesive programming identity and existed within the same hazy hinterlands as IFC.

 

Rectify
Adelaide Clemens as Tawney and Aden Young as Daniel in Sundance Channel’s Rectify. (Sundance Channel)

 

But in the last year, Sundance Channel has found itself in the white-hot spotlight normally reserved for AMC home of Mad Men, Breaking Bad, and The Walking Dead—thanks to a slew of high-profile and critically acclaimed shows, like the gripping paraplegic unscripted series Push Girls, Jane Campion’s haunting mystery drama Top of the Lake, and now Rectify, a six-episode drama that begins Monday.

The network’s first wholly owned original series, Rectify, created by Ray McKinnon, is exactly the type of show that would have once aired on AMC. (Ironically enough, it was originally developed for the channel.) It’s a breathtaking work of immense beauty and a thought-provoking meditation on the nature of crime and punishment, of identity and solitude, of guilt and absolution. It is, quite simply, the best new show of 2013.

Sentenced to die for the rape and murder of a 15-year-old girl, Daniel Holden (Aden Young) is released from prison after 19 years, when his original sentence is vacated, due to new DNA evidence that was overlooked at the time of his original trial. Thanks to the persistence of his headstrong sister, Amantha (a perfectly flinty Abigail Spencer), and his lawyer, Jon Stern (Luke Kirby), Daniel returns home to his mother (True Blood’s J. Smith-Cameron) and to a world he hasn’t seen since he was a teenager. In the small town of Paulie, Georgia, Daniel must rediscover a life forgotten and distant, while outside forces look to demonize him and swing the executioner’s axe once more.

 

With Rectify, McKinnon creates a world of light and darkness, and of heaven and hell, one that exerts a powerful gravity from which it is impossible to escape.

 

I watched the six-episode first season of Rectify with the sort of rapt attention one usually reserves for high-end television dramas these days, but with one distinct difference. Like Top of the Lake before it, I watched Rectify in two sittings, eagerly speeding through these six episodes with almost beatific devotion. I don’t want to call that “binge watching,” because binge has a rather negative connotation (it implies that you should, perhaps, feel guilt for overindulging). Instead, I see it as “holistic viewing,” attempting to judge the work on its complete form, rather than on just its individual parts.

 

In either case, however, Rectify embraces a gritty independent cinema feel, delivering installments (and a larger whole) that is both transcendent and weighty, and able to be enjoyed and felt on multiple levels. The twin overarching plots—Did Daniel commit this heinous crime and, if not, who did? How does Daniel readjust to life outside prison?—are merely a gateway for exploring a host of substantive issues, ranging from morality and religious belief to issues of connection and isolation.

 

After a two-decade stint on death row, Daniel emerges to a world that he does not recognize, and which largely sees him as a figure of scorn and hatred or, at the very least, curiosity and suspicion. Young delivers a dazzling performance as Daniel, a man metaphorically untethered from time and space. Daniel often feels as though he is still in high school, rather than a man in his late 30s; Young imbues a scene of him in the bath, staring at his reflection and the unfamiliar lines on his face, with a sense of wonder and dread. A DVD player becomes an emblem of time’s swift passage; an ancient video game console (and Sonic the Hedgehog) a connection to his lost youth.

Within Rectify, time itself seems fluid and yielding, as the action ricochets between Daniel’s reawakening to sensations and his time on death row, best embodied in his friendship with a fellow death row convict, Kerwin, played with immense compassion by Johnny Ray Gill. Here, in a virtual no-man’s land, Daniel finds himself trapped between an angel and devil, a sort of cinder block purgatory where, condemned to death, he awaits the final verdict. On the outside, Daniel finds himself adrift, and despite the well-meaning intentions of his family, he wanders, lost, in a vast wilderness. His saintly sister-in-law, Tawney (Adelaide Clemens, who could easily be a long-lost sibling of Michelle Williams and Carey Mulligan), offers Daniel a tether, seeing her faith as a way of saving his soul.

 

Daniel himself seems to exist outside or above human emotion, exhibiting a sort of Zen calm that is at odds with his situation. Young speaks in a deliberately slow, languid style—one that echoes the show itself—as if he is relearning human language word by word. But despite the morose overtones, the show thrives in its depiction of beauty, which it finds in the natural world and in the unexpected connections between people. A grove of trees becomes something profound, a sunrise something majestic, an embrace an electric current. Everything Daniel encounters—including himself—is a puzzle to be solved.

 

Despite the intensity of the townspeople’s gaze and the palpable heat of their hatred, Young’s Daniel retains a sense of wonder about the world around him as he rediscovers what it means to be human. Daniel’s release from prison creates ripples throughout Paulie, and his presence has unforeseen consequences for all of his family’s members. Rifts form where there were none; the marriage between Daniel’s thorny step-brother, Ted Jr. (Clayne Crawford), and Tawney suddenly splintering under scrutiny. And when Ted Jr. trains his rancor onto Daniel, the results are startling.

 

Rectify deftly walks a wire-thin tightrope when it comes to Daniel’s guilt or innocence. What happened the night of Hannah’s murder remains a tantalizing mystery, one with clues sprinkled throughout the six episodes. While Daniel attempts to come to terms with his hard-earned freedom, others—including a venal state senator (Michael O’Neill) and a lazy sheriff (J.D. Evermore)—look to pin the blame for Hannah’s rape and murder back onWith Rectify, McKinnon creates a world of light and darkness, and of heaven and hell, one that exerts a powerful gravity from which it is impossible to escape. Still, there are glimpses of pure joy to be found here, moments of profound beauty and intensity that are unlike anything else on television. And when Amantha comes across Daniel dancing to Cracker’s “Low” on his ancient Walkman in the attic, and she can’t help but smile, it reminds us that, even in the valley of the shadow of death, the human spirit is unbreakable.

 

 

The Daily Beast

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